Month: December 2014

New Year Paranormal Book Poll

Happy New Year everyone from Crime Scene Reviews. To get the new year off with a bang, let’s take a dip into the world of the paranormal. Here are two smashing book titles, written with wit, daring and verve. Both crime novels have sassy, smart, highly competent female detectives, both of them ‘gifted’ or ‘cursed’ with paranormal abilities. Both titles have been taken from Book Club Reading List. Please help me decide which one to review first by voting in the book poll! The first choice is First Grave on the Right by Darynda Jones: As the only grim...

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Author Interview: Geraldine Evans, author of Blood on the Bones

1. How did you first get started as a crime writer? Did you have any murderous impulses of your own that you needed to sublimate? I’ll say! I originally started out trying to become a romance author. After writing a romantic novel a year for six years and collecting rejections for all of them, I finally had one accepted. But then the publisher rejected my next novel in the same genre. I felt (strongly) that the only way for the ensuing murderous rage not to potentially land me in prison was if I restricted it to fiction. So Dead Before Morning, the first book in my...

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Book Review – Blood on the Bones by Geraldine Evans

Blood on the Bones is the 9th book in British author Geraldine Evans’ Rafferty and Llewellyn cozy mystery series and it makes for a very absorbing read. This is a crime novel with depth and substance, which exchanges cheap thrills for some very meditative ruminations on religious faith and doubt. A body has been discovered buried in the gardens of the Carmelite Monastery of the Immaculate Conception. Detective Inspector Joseph Rafferty, a lapsed Catholic of long repute, is assigned to the case and finds himself confronting the demons of his own harsh Catholic upbringing. Could one or more of the sisters...

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Author Interview: Peter van Wermeskerken, Author of Double Spy

Double Spy is such a fascinating account of this secret world of counter-espionage. One gets the impression reading it, that in some ways you had quite an interesting time during this experience? Would this be accurate to say? – Yes, it was interesting. Spy-work is an activity for which one is asked. This kind of job is not offered in newspapers or on the net nowadays. A combination of factors made me interesting to the East Germans: 1. Of course they’d followed me during my first visit in 1963 and thought I was able to cope with stress; 2. As a journalist I had  an entry almost everywhere. 3. In Holland I was not suspected, since I was politically active in the party in Holland that was most against communism; 4. They thought I would be loyal to them because of my girlfriend. For the Dutch BVD it was of interest to Holland accept the free offer of a loyal young Dutchman to work for them and spy-out the foreign espionage department of the Stasi in the way they worked. Were you shocked by the conditions of life in East Germany when you first visited? What struck you the most about the conditions? – At that time – mid-sixties – the standard of living in the GDR was not much less than in Western Europe. America was well ahead. East...

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Book Review – Double Spy by Peter van Wermeskerken

Those who haven’t been taught to think critically about the society in which they live cannot ask critical questions. They cannot ask themselves, those to whom they are close, and those in their surroundings. This ultimately means an introverted society – a communist society,  for example- that discourages creativity and eventually fails.    Dutch citizen Peter van Wermeskerken has quite a story to tell, and he tells it with considerable wit, humor and style. In 1967, at the young age of 27 and with no formal education, he was recruited by the notorious East German spy agency HUV, popularly...

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